Friday, July 2, 2010

News About Google - 02 July 2010

  • Finding soccer stats with the Google Search Appliance

    July 1, 2010

    For the past few weeks, many football fans have been living and breathing just one thing: the World Cup. When they’re not watching on the matches, many people have flocked to FIFA.com, the source for the latest info on players, standings and scores.

    With all these people looking for the latest and greatest on their favorite sport, we’re pleased that FIFA has chosen the Google Search Appliance to power search on their website. With the GSA, FIFA.com can provide universal search across all types of content. Try searching for “Messi” from FIFA.


  • Taking off with ITA

    July 1, 2010

    Today, almost half of all airline tickets are sold online. But for many people, finding the right flight at the best price is a frustrating experience; pricing and availability change constantly, and even a simple two city itinerary involves literally thousands of different options. We’d like to make that search much easier, which is why I’m pleased to announce that today we have signed an agreement to acquire ITA, a Boston-based software company specializing in organizing airline data, including flight times, availability and prices.

    While


  • Discover v2009: Working with AuthTokens

    July 1, 2010

    Authorization tokens were introduced with v2009 as part of the authorization mechanism adopted for the new version, ClientLogin.
    This new approach allows us to separate authorization from API
    requests, making it a two step process: first retrieve a token, and
    then include it with your requests.


    How ClientLogin works


    ClientLogin
    was designed as a standalone authentication and authorization procedure
    that returns a token, if successful. This token is then supplied
    together with the requests as a form of proof that the user is who they
    claim to be, and that they are allowed access to the API. Since both
    the authorization and the requests happen over SSL connections, there
    is no risk of anyone retrieving the token and impersonating the user.


    Explaining
    how to implement a full ClientLogin handler is outside the scope of
    this blog post, but for the full details on the protocol please consult
    the documentation. Here is a small example of how to log in using the AuthToken module included with the Ruby client library (which can be used outside of it, since its only dependency is the httpclient gem):

    require 'authtoken'

    auth_token = AdWords::AuthToken.get_token(email, password,

    'www.google.com', 443, true)


    Other client library projects include NoClientLib pages in their wikis detailing how to perform the ClientLogin step (as well as all other steps in a successful request) without the client library.

    If
    you’re using the client libraries, the ClientLogin step is usually
    handled for you, although you’ll still need to keep an eye out for any
    errors. The Readme file included with your client library has more
    details.


    Remember to reuse the authorization tokens


    This
    is a point of some confusion among developers, and illustrates one of
    the key differences in authorization between v13 and v2009: In v13, you
    authenticated and authorized every request by sending your account
    credentials
    as part of the header; in v2009, you authenticate with ClientLogin beforehand and then authorize your request to the AdWords API by supplying the token generated by ClientLogin.

    A naive migration from v13 to v2009 would generate a new token for every request and insert it into the header. This is a bad idea.
    Such an implementation will very likely cause your software to run into
    CAPTCHAs and block your accounts until the CAPTCHAs are resolved.


    A
    correct implementation would generate the token, cache it, and reuse it
    for all subsequent requests with that email address, even against the
    sandbox.


    Handling expiration and errors


    Tokens
    don’t last forever; as a security mechanism, they only last up to two
    weeks. Do bear in mind, though, that this doesn’t mean they’ll last a
    full two weeks: Authorization tokens can at any time be revoked for any
    number of reasons (usually for security). If a token has been revoked,
    you’ll get back an
    AuthenticationError with the reason GOOGLE_ACCOUNT_COOKIE_INVALID.

    Most of these errors can be handled simply by requesting a new authorization token, but if you get back a CaptchaRequired
    error when performing the ClientLogin interactions, you’ll need the
    user to resolve the CAPTCHA before you’re allowed generation of new
    tokens (or wait approximately 5 minutes, after which it will work
    again). The error message will include a URL to the image and a CAPTCHA
    token, so you can embed this directly into your application, without
    having to redirect the user to a web page. Check
    the ClientLogin documentation for details.

    What to keep in mind when implementing your application


    When implementing your application, keep these best practices in mind:
    • Generate a new token before the first request your application makes. You’ll need a token for every different email header that you use, so:
      • if you log in by setting the email header to your MCC (My Client Center) account and then change the clientEmail header to the different accounts you’re accessing, you’ll only need a single token;
      • if you log in by setting the email and password headers directly to those of the different accounts you’re accessing, you’ll need a new token for each.
    • Reuse this token in subsequent requests.
    • If you receive an AuthenticationError back, take a look at the reason:
      • if it indicates an expired token, try generating a new one and proceeding;
      • if it indicates an unrecoverable error, present the information to the user, and let them decide how to proceed.


    Finally, if you’re using one of our client libraries,
    then we have good news for you: the first two steps are already taken
    care of! Just set your credentials according to the instructions for
    your specific client library, and it will manage both v13 and v2009
    authorization for you.


    Keep in mind that if you have any further questions or run into any other authorization issues, the documentation and the forum are the right place to go!


    --Sérgio Gomes, AdWords API Team




  • Grandmother’s guide to video chat

    July 1, 2010

    (Cross-posted from the Gmail Blog)

    Often when I tell people that I work on Google video chat, I hear stories about how they’ve used it to give a video tour of a new home to friends, introduce a baby to relatives, keep in touch with traveling loved ones... the list goes on. This got me thinking about how convenient—and sometimes even magical—the experience of video chatting is.

    So when I saw that my grandma—who loves keeping in touch with family more than anyone—wasn’t set up to use video chat, I decided to help her get started. While


  • Grandmother's guide to video chat

    July 1, 2010

    (Cross-posted from the Gmail Blog)

    Often when I tell people that I work on Google video chat, I hear stories about how they’ve used it to give a video tour of a new home to friends, introduce a baby to relatives, keep in touch with traveling loved ones... the list goes on. This got me thinking about how convenient— and sometimes even magical — the experience of video chatting is.

    So when I saw that my grandma, who loves keeping in touch with family more than anyone, wasn’t set up to use video chat, I decided to help her get started. While


  • Grandmother's guide to video chat

    July 1, 2010



    Often when I tell people that I work on Google video chat, I hear stories about how they’ve used it to give a video tour of a new home to friends, introduce a baby to relatives, keep in touch with traveling loved ones... the list goes on. This got me thinking about how convenient— and sometimes even magical — the experience of video chatting is.

    So when I saw that my grandma, who loves keeping in touch with family more than anyone, wasn’t set up to use video chat, I decided to help her get started


  • Tips & Tricks: Using Images in Google documents

    July 1, 2010

    As anyone working on a term paper, project plan, or party invitation will tell you, there’s a lot of truth in the old saying, “a picture is worth a thousand words.” With the new Google Documents editor, you can easily find and insert the perfect image into a document and it will behave exactly as you’d like it.

    To get started, select Image from the Insert menu. In Google documents, you can import images from your computer or from a URL. But sometimes you don’t have the image you want to use on hand. Whether it’s a map of the Roman Empire or


  • Celebrating Pride 2010

    July 1, 2010

    Googlers came out en masse this year to celebrate Pride around the world, in cities ranging from Dublin to Pittsburgh. Pride celebrations are a time for family, friends and members of the LGBT* community to reiterate their commitment to equality and honor the trailblazers whose efforts made it possible for us to stand out and proud today.

    Nearly 300 Googlers marched with colorful balloons down Market Street for San Francisco's 40th annual Pride parade. We braved the rain in Boston, enjoyed the sun in New York, rode a trolley in Chicago and marched


  • The Broad Match Modifier and the API

    July 1, 2010

    Back in May, we announced the new “broad match modifier” in AdWords, which lets you create keywords with more reach than phrase match and more control than broad match. For now, this feature is only available in the UK and Canada, but it will be rolled out to more countries this summer.

    We’ve heard developers asking when this will be supported in the API, so we want to let you know that it already is. To use the broad match modifier, simply add plus signs (+) to your keyword text as desired. Because these keywords are still considered BROAD


  • Bringing federal IT into the cloud

    July 1, 2010



    The cloud improves security. The cloud saves taxpayer dollars. The cloud makes government more efficient.

    That’s the message Mike Bradshaw, Director of Google Federal, will take to the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform during today’s hearing on federal IT and cloud computing.

    Mike’s testimony will highlight three main points:
    • First, cloud computing can provide improved security. Under legacy computing models, data is stored on local computers – this is the equivalent of keeping

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